Many Wet-Condition Crop Concerns Ahead

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Bryce AndersonDTN Senior Ag MeteorologistOMAHA (DTN) — Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the USDA Midwest Climate Hub are worried about how summer 2019 conditions will treat crops that are already behind the development time curve because of wet and cool weather.In the NOAA North Central climate region, the month of May “was one for the record books,” according to Montana State Climatologist Kelsey Jencso, during a conference call. He noted that March through May average temperatures in the region that extends from the Rocky Mountains in the west to the Allegheny Plateau in the east were mainly below- to much-below average. Accompanying that cool spring pattern, precipitation was “mainly much above average,” except for the state of North Dakota, which had a drier month.Looking ahead to July, Jencso highlighted the June NOAA Climate Prediction Center’s forecast for central U.S. temperatures to have an elevated prospect of being below normal, while precipitation chances are elevated for above-normal amounts. “The odds are tilted toward this (cool and wet trend) continuing” in the Midwest and High Plains, he noted.With that cool and wet forecast, Jencso listed characteristics and effects the region is likely to experience. They include: cold and wetness; delayed development; millions prevented planting acres; varied weed problems; disease from wet conditions; slow emergence of corn and soybeans; and crops that will likely struggle through the entire growing season.“There’s a strong connection at the (land) surface level in summer between wetter and cooler along with dry and warm,” noted USDA Midwest Climate Hub Director Dennis Todey. “When soils and surfaces are wet, it leads to evaporative cooling (interferes with prolonged heat buildup in the Midwest). That’s a big player.”Todey noted some crop issues have already been developing. “The problem is that we’ve put a decent amount of seed in the ground that has ongoing issues,” he said. “There are fields where it’s either been too wet or is becoming too wet, causing soil compaction. This is limiting to root development and emergence. Heavy rain has caused crusting of soils. Ongoing wetness leads to disease. And, people (producers) have not been able to do weed control.”Crop development and reproduction phases — corn pollination and soybean flowering — are on the minds of the experts with the July temperature forecast looking relatively cool. “We need warmer temperatures to push corn along,” Todey said. “The overall outlook doesn’t give a lot of optimism for corn to reach development by the end of the (crop) year.”That means crops will be using every available growing degree day to go through the various production phases. But, that takes time, and climate experts are concerned that time may run out in the 2019 season.“Don’t even mention early frost,” Todey said.Bryce Anderson can be reached at [email protected] @BAndersonDTN(BAS/CZ)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

"Many Wet-Condition Crop Concerns Ahead"

Two Facts Everyone Should Know about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study

first_imgBy: David Sexton, Jr.Pexels[Child Eyes by Dominique Feldwick-Davis, CC0]The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) studyThe Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study was originally conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Kaiser Permanente between the years of 1995 and 1997. Since then, it has become one of the most influential public health studies of its kind, prompting investigations into the impact of ACEs on several health and well-being outcomes, such as the risk of alcoholism, smoking, depression, financial distress, and poor work performance (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2016). The research team gathered information about participants’ past childhood experiences, and this information was then compared to self-reported health and well-being data provided by participants to determine how childhood experiences can affect the future well-being of the people who suffer childhood maltreatment (Felitti et al., 1998).The researchers found that traumatic childhood experiences can have serious effects on development, health, and well-being in the future (Felitti, 1998). While a popular topic in the research community, the ACE study is a surprisingly obscure topic for the general public; however, its investigation has produced findings that suggest ACEs can have truly profound consequences for children and their futures. The following are, in my opinion, two of the most shocking insights the ACE study has produced:Adverse Childhood Experiences Does NOT Refer Only to Physical AbuseUpon encountering the term Adverse Childhood Experience, one may be inclined to assume it must refer to physical abuse. However, abuse is only one type of maltreatment that can have an enduring impact on a child’s future. According to the Felitti et al., (1998), Adverse Childhood Experiences refer to three categories of childhood maltreatment: abuse, neglect, and household challenges. Abuse can be physical, emotional, or sexual and neglect can be physical or emotional, as well. It is no surprise that such experiences in childhood could result in hardship for children in the future. However, it is both shocking and distressing to learn that more common, less blatant factors in childhood can also do great harm. Household challenges are factors about a child’s home life, such as growing up around domestic violence or relatives with substance abuse problems, and these experiences can have as significant an impact as physical abuse and neglect on future health outcomes (Felitti et al., 1998).Adverse Childhood Experiences Result in Significant Changes to the Development of the BrainThe term Adverse Childhood Experiences refer to the types of maltreatment mentioned above, but Nakazawa (2016) importantly emphasizes that the term specifies these events are prolonged, unpredictable, and cause a great deal of stress. As a result, the children who experience them endure a near constant stress-response. The physiological stress response is the familiar fight-or-flight state that individuals experience to cope with a stressful event. ACEs put a child’s stress response into overdrive, which causes chemical changes to the genes responsible for regulating it. The result is a predisposition to maintain a high-stress response consistently and well into adult life, which puts individuals at risk of a plethora of serious conditions, such as heart disease.Want to Learn More?To learn more about the ACE study and the effects of ACEs on health and well-being, you can watch the MFLN Family Development Team’s archived free webinar, presented by Dr. Melissa Merrick, Science Lead for the ACE study. FREE CEUS are available upon completion.ReferencesCenters for Disease Control and Prevention, (2016, April 1). ACE study. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/index.htmlFelitti, V. J., Anda R. F., Nordenberg, D., Williamson, D. F., Spitz, A. M., Edwards, V., Koss M. P., & Marks, J. S. (1998). Relationship of childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The adverse childhood experiences (ACE) study. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 14(4), 245-258.Nakazawa, D. J., (2016, September 8). 7 ways childhood adversity changes a child’s brain. Retrieved from: https://acestoohigh.com/2016/09/08/7-ways-childhood-adversity-changes-a-childs-brain/This post was written by a member of the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.last_img read more

"Two Facts Everyone Should Know about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study"

The Worst College Football Game In The Worst College Football Town

Alabama vs. Auburn, Florida vs. Florida State, Michigan vs. Ohio State. Those are the types of college football rivalries from which sports legends are made. This weekend on the northern tip of Manhattan in New York City (known for having the lowest percentage of college football fans in the nation), a different type of history will be produced. The 0-8 Cornell Big Red will visit the 0-8 Columbia Lions. It’s a game sure to be memorable not because the two teams are so good, but because both of them are so bad.I’m a Columbia Lions football fan. I listen to their games on WKCR-FM. I’m attending Saturday’s game against Cornell. I went to every home game from 1994 to 2000, and I treasure an autographed photo with then-Lions and later NFL star Marcellus Wiley.But Columbia enters the game with statistics that resemble those of a peewee football team dropped into the NFL. Columbia has scored more than seven points in only one game this season. Last week against Harvard, the Lions suffered the ultimate embarrassment: getting shut out 45-0.The away team hasn’t been much better. Only against Princeton has Cornell put up more than 16 points in a game, and the Big Red still managed to score fewer points in that game, 27, than Columbia’s highest point total this year (28). Last week, Cornell went down 42-7 against Dartmouth, and that wasn’t even their worst defeat of the season so far.Not surprisingly, of the 121 teams in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS, formerly known as Division I-AA) for which the NCAA provides statistics, Columbia is dead last in offensive points per game at 8.6. Cornell is not far behind, at No. 113, scoring only 12.9 points per game. In point differential (points scored minus points allowed), Columbia ranks No. 118 with -31.2. Cornell is ranked No. 114 with -21.5.The wretchedness goes beyond the scoreboard, though. In each facet of the game, these two teams have been exceptionally awful.The Lions rank last in the FCS with 51.3 rushing yards per game (YPG). Cornell comes in at No. 117 with 88 YPG.When it comes to passing, Columbia and Cornell are deceptively bad. Columbia has passed for 221.6 YPG (good for a rank of No. 52), while Cornell has passed for 179.3 YPG (good for No. 88). Of course, both teams have almost always been behind, so they have to pass in an effort to catch up. Passer efficiency, which takes into account pass attempts, completions, interceptions, touchdowns and yards, places Columbia No. 120 out of 121 and Cornell just slightly better at No. 103.The defenses aren’t much better. Columbia has given up 273.8 YPG on the ground (No. 120). Cornell has done better, at 189.1 YPG, but that still ranks only 84th. In passing defense, Columbia ranks No. 100 with 246.9 YPG, and Cornell lags at No. 106 with 262 YPG. In passer efficiency defense, Columbia comes in at No. 100 and Cornell at No. 118.Finally, there’s special teams. Both teams have made only two field goals all year, and both of those came in the same game for each team. Columbia and Cornell rank No. 111 and No. 112, respectively, with just 16.96 and 16.91 yards per kickoff return. In yards per punt return, Columbia ranks No. 75 with 6.80, and Cornell ranks a pathetic No. 118 with just 2.29.All hope is not lost, however. The two teams excel in one notable category: punting. Columbia has punted an amazingly high 7.25 times per game, and Cornell has done so 6.63 times per game. Those are good enough to rank No. 6 and No. 16, respectively! And perhaps because they have gotten so much practice, Columbia has averaged 34.83 yards per punt, and Cornell 36.34. Those averages rank in the top half of the FCS, at Nos. 60 and 25.So, if you live in the New York metro area, are a big fan of punting and want to see two teams that cannot score or stop anyone else from scoring, you’re in luck. It’s sure to be a riveting affair in a city that just doesn’t care. read more

"The Worst College Football Game In The Worst College Football Town"

The Warriors And Rockets Have Reinvented Modern NBA Defense Yes Defense

HOUSTON — The NBA Finals are the crown jewel of the playoffs for obvious reasons, but it’d be hard to argue with anyone who views this vaunted Western Conference finals matchup between the Golden State Warriors and Houston Rockets, which opens Monday night, as this year’s main event.The Warriors have two of the best three players in the world in their starting five, have won two of the past three titles and appeared borderline annoyed by having to face questions about whether they’re concerned to be starting a series without home-court advantage for the first time in their recent championship era. The Rockets won an NBA-best 65 regular-season games, have likely MVP James Harden and future Hall of Famer Chris Paul in their backcourt and possess a group of sweet-shooting teammates who stretch the floor as if it’s made of Play-Doh.The offensive firepower — Golden State and Houston finished No. 1 and No. 2 in offensive efficiency and virtually averaged the same number of points per 100 possessions — guarantees we’ll hear plenty about how well these teams score. But because of that, something else about the Rockets and Warriors may fly beneath the radar: The NBA’s two best clubs are even further ahead of the curve on defense. In a league that’s more reliant than ever on the pick-and-roll offense, these defenses are unmatched when it comes to their versatility and ability to switch assignments on the fly.Houston defended a screen-and-roll by switching on 1,406 possession chances during the regular season, while Golden State orchestrated 1,075 switches of its own, according to data from Second Spectrum and NBA Advanced Stats. These teams — which more than doubled the switch totals compiled by 20 other squads — were outliers: The Lakers were the only other club that broke 800 switches during the 2017-18 season.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/rox.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.And it isn’t just that the Warriors and Rockets switch a lot. They also use the strategy to fuel their high-octane offenses. Houston forced 3.5 turnovers per 100 switches, while Golden State forced 2.4, the best rates in the league, according to Second Spectrum.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/warriors.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.That ability — having two similarly sized players trade their defensive responsibilities quickly enough during a pick-and-roll that the offense doesn’t gain an edge — speaks to the length and versatility these Western Conference foes have. And it takes on added importance in a matchup like this, in which the Warriors and Rockets use an array of screens (albeit differently1The Warriors use fewer pick-and-roll plays than any other team in basketball, while the Rockets use more direct screens than any team, according to Second Spectrum data. That said, Golden State, seeking to free up Klay Thompson, sets more off-ball screens than any club.) to free up their most lethal shooters beyond the 3-point line.“You have to cover more ground than ever before. It’s amazing: Sometimes I’ll turn on the classic sports channel and find Lakers-Celtics games from the 1980s — some of the best games ever — and the game is played in this tiny little radius. Now it’s way out on the perimeter,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said. “Every possession was, you dump it into the post, a double comes, and you might see six or eight threes taken in a game. But everything was different. The rules were different. The talent is different. Very few low-post players anymore. The league’s adapted. Coaches have adapted. Things are ever-changing. And you have to change along with that.”Anyone who’s followed the Warriors’ dominance these past few years knows a huge chunk of that success stems from Golden State’s ability to go small and play Draymond Green — who may not even be the ideal height for a traditional small forward — at center. That alignment, with the addition of Andre Iguodala, gives the Warriors four long-limbed clones who are laterally quick enough and strong enough to cover almost anyone. With that defensive speed, Golden State can gamble a bit more on that end; it knows the opposing offense generally won’t be able to find mismatches, even if a switch has taken place.“At the end of the day, it’s really just another way for us to cut off the other team’s options with our versatility,” said Green, the league’s reigning defensive player of the year, who sometimes calls an audible — and moves a teammate out of the way — before a screen occurs to be in position to thwart the play.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/dray.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Houston has also made life difficult for opponents with its versatility on defense. By and large, the Rockets have been far more successful on defense than most would have guessed, jumping to sixth in defensive efficiency this season after ranking 21st in 2015-16 and 18th in 2016-17. Adding the sticky-handed Paul certainly factored into that improvement, but plugging free-agent signings Luc Mbah a Moute and P.J. Tucker into the lineup likely did even more for the defense.“Their ability to guard 1 through 5 makes it so much easier for us. That’s why we’re so much better on defense this year,” Houston guard Eric Gordon said of the duo, which sometimes shares the frontcourt despite neither standing taller than 6-foot-8. (Nonetheless, the lineup pays dividends: Houston, trailing by 14 heading into the fourth quarter at Portland in December, came back to win by 7 while using Mbah a Moute and Tucker at the 4 and 5 for the entire period.)Mbah a Moute, in particular, has become a vital piece. According to a defensive dashboard created by Nylon Calculus contributor Krishna Narsu, the wing’s versatility was highly unusual. This season, he was one of just seven players to spend at least 15 percent of his time guarding each of the following positions: point guard, shooting guard, small forward and power forward.Unsurprisingly, the Rockets struggled in his absence during the middle of the campaign, enduring a season-long five-game losing streak. The Rockets’ 101.2 defensive rating with Mbah a Moute on the court this season would have ranked best in the league on a team scale, while their 105.4 rating without him would have had them just slightly above average, at No. 12.Above all else, Mbah a Moute and Tucker carry so much importance because they make Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni — one of the game’s brightest offensive minds who was never really known for switching with his defenses — more comfortable utilizing this style of play.“To even have a chance against a team like Golden State, you have to make a point of not being put into rotations. They’ll kill you that way. So I’m just happy we have a roster full of guys to where it makes sense to be able to switch the way we do,” he said.To be sure: Neither team is breaking from decades of tradition with this strategy on defense, even if they are using it far more often than everyone else. On some level, this is no different from what the LeBron James-era Miami Heat did when it rode small ball to a championship in 2012. (Kerr would be the first to tell you that he never envisioned Green playing the rim-protector role when he took the Warriors job. “We didn’t know Draymond was Draymond yet,” he told me.) Beyond that, it wouldn’t be fair to gloss over how unbelievably dominant these teams are on offense, given how big a role scoring plays in their success.Yet there are reasons to think that creative, well-timed switches will heavily factor into this series as the chess match of hunting for what each team perceives to be mismatches unfolds.The Warriors have made no secret of the fact that they like to post up Kevin Durant when they spot him being guarded by Paul following a screen.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/durant.mp400:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Meanwhile, Harden and the Rockets are even less shy about attacking Stephen Curry; they’ll often run multiple pick-and-rolls until they get him on an island for a 1-on-1 matchup. In fact, they used this tactic six times in a seven-possession span during the final four minutes of the teams’ last regular-season meeting Jan. 20, a 116-108 Houston win.“We’re just gonna watch film and find ways to attack them offensively,” Harden said when I asked about that sequence. “We’ll take our shots, play unselfishly. Pretty simple.”Curry thinks this will mean isolating him in the same way this series. “I hope it’s every single play,” he told The Athletic’s Anthony Slater. “If you look at the ‘Hamptons Five’ lineup that’s out there, I would probably do the same exact thing if I was coaching against me. You’ve got Klay (Thompson), Andre, Draymond and KD out there. I embrace those opportunities to get stops and try to make it tough in those iso situations … and just do my job.”The likely MVP seeking out a former MVP for a 1-on-1 matchup, for the right to play in the NBA Finals. A pretty cool outcome, all thanks to how these juggernauts force and handle switches on defense.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

"The Warriors And Rockets Have Reinvented Modern NBA Defense Yes Defense"

Ohio State mens basketball student managers arent all water and towels

The squeaking of brand new Nikes against polished hardwood fills the expansive interior of an empty Schottenstein Center. Bouncing basketballs, blowing whistles and exhausted grunts combine to form the soundtrack of a Buckeye basketball practice. Some of the members of the Ohio State men’s basketball program stand drenched in sweat, hands on their hips and watch as others participate in drills. These spectators and participants combine to comprise an indisposable crew on the floor, but they aren’t the basketball team. They’re the seven members of the Ohio State men’s basketball managerial staff. While the actual team wins the games and earns the headlines, the staff supporting the team is happy to sit behind the bench on game days, out of the spotlight. They’re OK with the idea that the outside world has no clue how important they were to coach Thad Matta and his teams’ preparations for victory. “A lot of people just think we’re all ‘water and towels’ and just kind of there,” said Weston Strayer, manager and a fourth-year in marketing. “But they don’t understand just how much time and work we put in each week to the program.” Their contributions are noticed by those who pay attention though. “The managers do everything you really don’t want to do, and they do it with a smile on their face,” said senior forward Evan Ravenel. “They’re one of the key components to our team, and we wouldn’t be half as good without those guys.” A typical OSU student gets up, goes to class, maybe goes to work afterward and then juggles homework with a social life. The managers have those same obligations, but in addition to their school obligations, they deal with between 35 and 40 hours a week of unpaid work for basketball activities. They show up for 10 a.m. practice an hour before to set up. They stay two hours after to rebound for players who want to get extra shots up or to run errands for coaches. It can end up being a five-hour shift. On game days, they’re there for the pre-game shootaround five hours before tip-off and will stay at the arena for the next eight hours, through the pre-game team meal and the game itself. During the games, they take advanced stats for the coaches, set up chairs on the court for the team during timeouts and manage Matta’s play-calling whiteboard. “Once the game starts, nothing we have done is going to change anything, but preparation-wise, we definitely help them out where we can,” Strayer said. “We try and do our best to help them prepare and make everything a little bit easier for them.” The man in charge of the managers is David Egelhoff, director of basketball operations. He’s been on the OSU staff for 10 years and in his current position for seven. In addition to handling the day-to-day, off-court activities of the basketball team, he handles the application and hiring process of the team’s managers and serves as their boss. It’s a position his past has qualified him for. Egelhoff served as a student manager for OSU’s basketball team from 1998 to 2002 under former OSU coach Jim O’Brien. He said his times as a manager make up some of his favorite college memories. “I’ve made lifelong friendships, not only with the managers but the coaching staffs and players I’ve worked with as well,” Egelhoff said. “We had a really enjoyable time doing a lot of things … those experiences we had were pretty special to me.” The sheer quantity of time the managers spend with each other has allowed them to form a special bond. “It’s a great group of guys, we joke and mess with each other and it’s a lot of fun,” Strayer said. “We kind of joke when we walk out of the tunnel (during home games), they announce the ‘three-time defending Big Ten champions’ and then we all kind of just come out before everyone, so I always wonder what people think when they see us in the suits walking out by the team.” Evan Kurt, a third-year manager and a fourth-year in marketing, said the experiences of going to the Final Four and to different venues around the country have made managing the “best time” of his life. While the managers know they will never make the game-winning shot, they also are aware that their weeklong contributions before the 40-minute games are vital. “There’s a lot that goes on at practices that people don’t see. If you don’t know all about what goes on behind the scenes, you don’t really understand,” Kurt said. “Game to game, it’s players and coaches who determine success, but behind the scenes, it’s us helping everybody improve and helping everybody get better.” The managers’ reward for the hours upon hours of dirty work isn’t fame, money or recognition. It’s something less tangible, but something the managers say is much more important. “The sense of being a part of the team,” Strayer said. “It’s one thing to be a fan, but to be emotionally involved, and to be with the team all the time and to be a part of the team is something I’ll never forget.” Ravenel, a player who has played on three Big Ten championship teams and a Final Four team, expressed the team’s gratitude for its managers. “A program like ours wouldn’t be able to be successful without guys like our managers,” Ravenel said.  This article has been revised to reflect the following correction: Correction: April 17, 2013 An earlier version of this story stated that Evan Ravenel played on two Final Four teams for OSU. In fact, he played on one. read more

"Ohio State mens basketball student managers arent all water and towels"

Columbus Crew lose first match under coach Gregg Berhalter fall to Toronto

Columbus Crew forward Jairo Arrieta (middle) shoots the ball during a game against the Philadelphia Union March 22 at Crew Stadium. The Crew won, 2-1.Courtesy of MCTThe best start to a season in franchise history has come to a halt for the Columbus Crew.After a strong start to its 2014 campaign, the Crew (3-1-0) suffered its first defeat of the year Saturday, falling 2-0 to Toronto FC (3-1-0) at Crew Stadium.U.S. Men’s National Team star and Toronto FC midfielder Michael Bradley scored in the 11th minute, his first Major League Soccer goal in nine years after playing in the Netherlands, Germany, England and Italy.Crew coach Gregg Berhalter said after the match that a poor performance during the first 20 minutes led to his team’s downfall.“We had a horrendous start to the game. It was sloppy in every sense of the word,” Berhalter said. “To me, it’s something where we got complacent and that’s the worst thing a team like us can do because we need to keep fighting. We need to keep pushing and we’re not there yet.”Crew midfielder Hector Jimenez had a similar impression of the team’s level of play early.“Those first 20 minutes were crucial, giving up that early goal, and it was hard for us to come back from that,” Jimenez said.Defender Josh Williams said the team tried to play wide, but couldn’t get the right delivery of the ball into the box.“It was just poor service. I think that played right into them,” Williams said. “They’ve got some big guys in the middle, you know, I think they kind of let us play out wide and cross the balls in and those guys were waiting for us.”Berhalter said the team’s failure to capitalize on its few chances was its downfall.“A couple chances, a couple cross bars, a couple things that hit the post and it didn’t work out,” Berhalter said. “But I attribute this loss to two things: Bad start to the game and a very well organized Toronto FC.”Toronto midfielder Issey Nakajima-Farran added a second goal in the 85th minute, triggering some Crew fans’ exit to the aisles as a tight 1-0 deficit suddenly doubled and extinguished any hopes for a comeback.Columbus had been riding a three-game winning streak before Saturday’s loss. The team’s home opener win over Philadelphia — bookended by road wins over D.C. United and Seattle — made for a perfect March.Williams said the drama and emotion of winning in Seattle March 29 on a 94th minute goal by Columbus’ Justin Meram could have played a role in the complacency against Toronto and that the players take responsibility for the loss.“You know, Gregg is going to take the blame. He already came in here and tried to take it but the players know, that’s just a good coach, him being him,” Williams said. “Practice felt a little lackadaisical this week, for whatever reason, I don’t know. Maybe it was just the high of Seattle. But it definitely wasn’t Gregg’s fault, and as players, we take responsibility for that … this week we’ve got to come out and train harder, prepare harder.”The Crew has a long week to shake off the loss, as the team is slated to travel to San Jose, Calif., to take on the winless San Jose Earthquakes Sunday at 3 p.m. The Black and Gold are set to return to Crew Stadium April 19 against D.C. United, and kickoff is scheduled for 7:30 p.m. read more

"Columbus Crew lose first match under coach Gregg Berhalter fall to Toronto"

Mens hockey Steve Miller signs on as associate head coach

Steve Miller has officially signed on to join the Ohio State men’s ice hockey coaching staff as associate head coach under Steve Rohlik, the school said Friday. Miller spent the past two seasons with Air Force as the director of hockey, and was an assistant coach on the gold medal-winning Team USA at the 2017 World Junior Championships — a team that featured Ohio State sophomore forward Tanner Laczynski.“Steve is one of the most respected coaches in college hockey,” Rohlik said. “He is outstanding at developing players and brings a great deal of championship experience to our team. We are thrilled to have him as a Buckeye. We can’t wait for the season to start.”A coaching veteran with 28 years of experience under his belt, Miller was rewarded in 2008 with the American Hockey Coaches Association’s Terry Flanagan Award, an honor recognized to an assistant coach for a career’s worth of coaching success.The bulk of Miller’s career was spent coaching the University of Denver where he spent 20 seasons, the first 17 of which as an assistant coach and latter three as associate head coach. While working with the Pioneers, Miller helped guide the team to back-to-back NCAA National Championships in 2004 and 2005, three Western Collegiate Hockey Association titles and four WCHA tournament titles. Regarded as a premier player-developer in the nation while at Denver, Miller coached 41 players to selections in the NHL draft, 55 All-WCHA honorees, 15 All-Americans and a pair of Hobey Baker Memorial Award Winners (given to the player deemed the best men’s collegiate hockey player in the nation).Miller began his coaching career with his alma mater, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota after playing three seasons of varsity hockey for the program. As a coach, Miller’s team immediately found success as it won the 1989 Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference playoff championship and reached the quarterfinals of the NCAA tournament that year.He then spent two years at Miami under George Gwozdecky — whom he followed to Denver — where he helped the program win its first Central Collegiate Hockey Association title. After his time spent at Denver, he worked at Providence as an associate head coach during the 2014-15 season when the Friars won the NCAA Championship.Miller brings his history of success to an Ohio State program on the rise after finishing 21-12-6, earning an at-large berth to the NCAA tournament for the first time since 2009. “I am honored and humbled to join such a prestigious institution and build on what Coach Rohlik and the student-athletes have achieved,” Miller said. “There are great things on the horizon for this program. I am excited to get going.”Miller’s careerOhio State associate head coach: 2017 – presentAir Force director of hockey: 2015-17Providence associate head coach: 2014-15University of Denver associate head coach: 2011-14University of Denver assistant coach: 1994-2011Miami University graduate assistant coach: 1992-1994St. Mary’s Univeristy of Minnesota: 1989-1992 read more

"Mens hockey Steve Miller signs on as associate head coach"

Pirlo explains retirement decision

first_imgAndrea Pirlo has revealed that he decided to end his playing career due to fears that he was reaching the point where he had passed his bestThe former Italian playmaker announced his retirement at the end of last year after enjoying a highly successful playing career that had spanned over two decades and had seen him major honours both at club and international level.At 38 years old, Pirlo decided that it was time to retire with his contract at New York City coming to an end.“I didn’t want to get to the moment where people would question whether or not I still had it. I didn’t want people in the stands watching me if I was overweight or hit a bad shot and saying things,” he told Vanity Fair, via ForzaItalianFootball.“I didn’t want them to see that and think ‘Pirlo is old, he is finished, he can’t do it anymore’. I never wanted people to think that.”Top 5 Players with the best signature boots in football Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – June 19, 2019 In world football and merchandising, there are many football players who have their own signature football boots and we are going to talk about…The former AC Milan and Juventus star is enjoying his free time with his family and has no plans to return to football in a coaching capacity immediately.“I’ve now had a lot of time to think about my future but we’ll see what happens. There’s no hurry. For now, I’m enjoying my family, my children and I’m travelling which I enjoy,” he added.“I’ll be going to the World Cup in the summer with my sponsors so I’ll be busy and I also play a lot of golf but I’m not on the level of [Andriy] Shevchenko or [Marco] van Basten!“I don’t know if I will become a coach, firstly I’d have to take my badges but it could be an idea.”last_img read more

"Pirlo explains retirement decision"