Here’s how I’d invest £100 per week in an ISA in 2021 to start earning a passive income

first_img Earning a passive income from investing in an ISA may seem more difficult now than it has been in previous years. After all, low interest rates are likely to remain in place throughout 2021. That means assets such as cash and bonds continue to offer low income returns.However, the stock market crash means that many FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 shares have high dividend yields at the present time. Their low share prices and maintained dividends could hold long-term investment appeal. Therefore, even modest regular investments could be a good starting point to make a rising income over the long run.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Investing £100 a week in an ISA to make a passive incomeAt the present time, the FTSE 100 offers a generous passive income. The index currently yields nearly 5%. That’s because it’s trading significantly lower than its record high following the 2020 stock market crash. Moreover, many of its members offer even higher dividend yields than the index at the present time. As such, an ISA investor could realistically build a portfolio of FTSE 100 shares that together have a combined yield in excess of the index’s 5%.Furthermore, it may be possible to obtain a relatively resilient income return from FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 shares. For example, investors may wish to consider a company’s financial position before they purchase. Businesses with low debt levels and substantial interest cover may be better able to cope with a period of weaker sales. Similarly, stocks with dividend cover in excess of one (where net profit covers dividends more than once) may offer a more robust passive income in 2021 and beyond.Obtaining a rising income return in the long runOf course, a £100 weekly ISA investment is unlikely to return a passive income large enough to provide financial freedom in 2021. However, the prospect of an improving economic outlook means that dividend growth rates in 2021 and beyond could strengthen significantly versus their current rates.After all, the world economy has always recovered from its downturns to post strong GDP growth over the long run. As a result, ISA investors may be able to enjoy a high yield today that grows at a fast pace over the coming years.As such, investing in companies that not only have high and affordable yields, but also offer dividend growth potential in future, could be a shrewd move. They may include stocks that are likely to benefit from long-term growth trends within their industry. Or maybe those companies with wide economic moats that can lead to rising profitability over the long run. They may be able to afford fast-rising dividend payouts in the coming years. And that could transform a modest regular ISA investment in 2021 into a surprisingly large passive income in the long run. Peter Stephens | Thursday, 3rd December, 2020 Image source: Getty Images. Enter Your Email Address Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Here’s how I’d invest £100 per week in an ISA in 2021 to start earning a passive income I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Peter Stephenslast_img read more

"Here’s how I’d invest £100 per week in an ISA in 2021 to start earning a passive income"

Gulf Coast churches remain in ‘rescue phase’ after Hurricane Michael

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 First responders and residents walk along a main street in Mexico Beach, Florida, on Oct. 11, 2018, one day after Hurricane Michael made landfall. Photo: Carlo Allegri/REUTERS[Episcopal News Service] Episcopal churches on the Gulf Coast, including parts of Florida, Georgia and North and South Carolina, continue to assess Hurricane Michael’s damage, with some in the hardest hit coastal areas still in the rescue phase.“We’re at a time when every tree is down and every roof is compromised,” said Dwight Babcock, diocesan administrator for the Episcopal Church of the Central Gulf Coast, in an Oct. 15 interview with Episcopal News Service. “This [recovery] is a marathon, not a sprint. We just don’t know what we’re looking at.”On Oct. 12, Babcock and Central Gulf Coast Bishop Russell Kendrick traveled east in Florida from Pensacola to Panama City and to other affected areas to visit some of the 11 affected churches. The bishop made a second trip the following day with a small group to distribute generators and other emergency supplies, said Babcock.Ten of the 11 damaged churches held services “in one form or another,” on Oct. 14; some were held inside the church buildings, while some were outdoors in pavilions, he said.On Oct. 10, Hurricane Michael made landfall near Panama City, Florida, as one of the strongest hurricanes ever to hit the mainland United States, killing 19 people. A Category 4 hurricane packing 155 mph winds, Michael wiped out trees and flattened buildings. Five days later thousands of people remained without electricity.“From Highway 79 to the eastern edge of our diocese, the road conditions are still not safe for anyone to travel,” said Kendrick in a video posted on the diocese’s website. “Please be patient. Let’s let the trained responders do their jobs and make the conditions safe so we can get in there and help as necessary.”The Episcopal Church of the Central Gulf Coast has created a Hurricane Relief Hub, listing ways to donate to hurricane relief efforts. The diocese also offers emergency preparedness and response resources. The diocese includes the Florida Panhandle and parts of southern Alabama.Communities inland, in Georgia and further into the Southeast, also were affected by Hurricane Michael; some of those communities continue to recover from Hurricane Florence, which made landfall as a Category 1 storm on Sept. 14 near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina. The Diocese of East Carolina, which covers North Carolina’s coast, also has issued an appeal for support.The Episcopal Diocese of Georgia reports significant damage in Albany, Bainbridge, Americus and the surrounding counties. Tree damage was significant in Albany, affecting the infrastructure and leaving many without power or potable water. In Bainbridge and in Decatur County, roofs were blown off and trees took out power lines, blocked streets, and crashed into houses, according to Episcopal Relief & Development.“The local dioceses are continuing to assess the damage caused by the storm,” said Katie Mears, senior director of Episcopal Relief & Development’s U.S. Disaster Program, in a statement posted on its website. “Disasters have three phases: rescue, relief and recovery. We are prepared to support them as we move into the next phase of providing relief to affected communities.”– Lynette Wilson is reporter and managing editor for Episcopal News Service. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Relief & Development Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL By Lynette WilsonPosted Oct 15, 2018 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Gulf Coast churches remain in ‘rescue phase’ after Hurricane Michaellast_img read more

"Gulf Coast churches remain in ‘rescue phase’ after Hurricane Michael"

Children waiting in pain need funding

first_imgEmail TAGS#SeeMearthritisDepartment of HealthHSEJuvenile Idiopathic Arthritislimerick Twitter WhatsApp Facebook SCAM ALERT: HSE warn of bogus calls following cyber attack Support for 22 Limerick nursing homes in Covid-19 battle RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Arthritis IrelandCHILDREN in Limerick living with painful Arthritis, which in some cases may threaten their sight, need urgent investment in services, according to Arthritis Ireland.The group is calling for immediate funding in paediatric rheumatology as waiting lists are growing nationally for children who need to see paediatric rheumatologists.An estimated 45 children in Limerick are living with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA).Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Symptoms of JIA can include swollen and painful joints, impaired coordination, fatigue, high fever, rashes, and for up to 30 per cent of patients, uveitis which is a potentially sight-threatening disease.Arthritis Ireland is calling upon the HSE and the Department of Health to implement the national model of care for paediatric rheumatology, which was approved in June 2016 and as part of National Arthritis Week April 9-15, has launched #SeeMe which is an awareness campaign to highlight this issue.Arthritis Ireland says that International best practice indicates that patients with suspected JIA should be seen by a paediatric rheumatologist within six weeks of the referral being made, however in Ireland children are waiting more than a year.The organisation said that the number of children and young people under 16 waiting more than a year to see a consultant paediatric rheumatologist increased by 80 per cent in the 12 months since January 2017. At the end of January 2018, 902 were on the rheumatology outpatient waiting list, a 33 per cent increase on January 2017.CEO of Arthritis Ireland Gráinne O’Leary said, “JIA is a long-term autoimmune disease that affects children and young people at a time when life should be an adventure. Our children and young people need and deserve to receive prompt, timely access to care, diagnosis and clinical assessment.“The way to address this is through the implementation of the national model of care for paediatric rheumatology. Despite being approved in June 2016, progress has been painfully slow in delivering upon its recommendations. With every delay and inaction, our children’s lives are impacted.”The model of care recommends the minimum requirements for a specialist team delivering paediatric rheumatology care should include six consultants, but there are currently 2 full time equivalent consultant paediatric rheumatologist posts in Ireland.Arthritis Ireland is asking people to sign a petition on their website calling on the Minister for Health to implement the model of care for paediatric rheumatology.Further information see www.juvenilearthritis.ie and www.arthritisireland.ie.More about health here. Radiographers in UHL making everyone smilecenter_img World Sepsis Day – Have You Asked, ‘Could it be Sepsis?’ Previous articleTot David comes out of his shell in ButterflyNext articleNorovirus Visitor Restrictions Tightened at UHL Louise Harrisonhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Linkedin Limerick Post Show | How to quit smoking Joint Easter message on Covid 19 from Limerick City and County Council, HSE, UL Hospitals and An Garda Síochána NewsHealthChildren waiting in pain need fundingBy Louise Harrison – April 13, 2018 1051 Advertisement Printlast_img read more

"Children waiting in pain need funding"

Credit Unions See Widespread Growth

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / Credit Unions See Widespread Growth Previous: January Housing Demand Hits 4-year Peak Next: Morgan Stanley Questions Early Rate-hike Signals  Print This Post Credit Unions See Widespread Growth Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago March 6, 2017 1,159 Views Credit unions are growing—both in membership and in deposits, according to recent data from the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA).NCUA’s Q4 2016 data, released this morning, shows deposits up 7.5 percent over the year, up to $1.09 trillion. Membership was also up for the year, jumping 4.1 percent from Q4 2015. Total membership in federally insured credit unions is now up to 106.9 million.Total credit union lending and member business lending both increased as well, jumping 10.4 percent (to $869.1 billion) and 14.3 percent (up $62.4 billion) respectively. Total lending was just $787 billion in 2015.Real estate loans, in particular, saw growth amongst credit union lenders. They rose 8.6 percent over the year, totaling $431.1 billion for the quarter. Auto loans rose 14 percent, and student loans increased by 9 percent.Other important statistics noted in NCUA’s data report include:Total credit union assets rose 7.3 percent, up to $1.29 trillion from 2015’s $1.2 trillion.The industry’s loan-to-share ratio rose to 79.5 percent, a jump of 2.1 percentage points over the year.Net income grew 10.6 percent, reaching $9.6 billion for the entire year—a $0.9 billion-dollar jump over 2015.Delinquency across credit unions remained steady at 83 basis points—just 2 points above 2015’s Q4 numbers. The net charge-off ratio rose from 48 basis points to 55.The return on average assets was 77 basis points, up 2 points from 2015. Credit unions designated as low-income rose from 2,297 to 2,491.According to Dan Berger, President and CEO of the National Association of Federally Insured Credit Unions, the NCUA’s data proves credit unions are doing their job right.“The year-end figures demonstrate credit unions’ solid commitment to providing excellent products and services to their members,” Berger said. “This data shows credit unions are maintaining healthy growth by doing what they do better than any other providers: focusing on the financial needs of their member-owners and keeping members’ interests as their top concern.”One of the few statistics to decline, according to the NCUA’s data, was the number of federally insured credit unions, which dropped from 6,021 to 5,785 year-over-year. To view the full data report, visit NCUA.gov. The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: credit Credit Unions NCUA Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago credit Credit Unions NCUA 2017-03-06 Staff Writer Share Save Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Staff Writer Sign up for DS News Daily The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days agolast_img read more

"Credit Unions See Widespread Growth"

People

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Law firmNabarro Nathanson has been appointed Sharon Tattersfield (pictured) aspersonnel manager of its Sheffield office. Her role involves a mixture ofhands-on operational and strategic input. She aims to develop procedures andpolicies while implementing new initiatives. She has legal and investmentbanking experience, and previously held a contract position as HR manager atsoftware development studio RuneCraft.KeithFaulkner has taken over as the Recruitment and Employment Confederation’s chairman.He starts immediately and will continue his role as Manpower’s director ofpublic affairs and chairman of Working Links. He will work closely with RECchief executive Tim Nicholson.JohnTaylor has become the first full-time chief executive of the employmentrelations service Acas. He joins from the Training and Enterprise Council ofSouth East Wales, where he was also chief exec. Taylor, who worked for Acas inits early days in the 1970s, will chair the management board, responsible forthe day-to-day running of the organisation, and will report to the Acascouncil.Globalactuarial company Watson Wyatt has appointed Nicola Cull to lead its employeebenefits communications team. Cull joins Wyatt from Aon Consulting, where shewas principal communication consultant. She has worked in the communication ofbenefits, pensions and HR for more than 10 years and has developedcommunications strategies for blue-chip clients.TopjobCommerciallaw firm Bond Pearce has appointed Paul Strutt as its first HR director.Struttbrings experience from a varied career in HR. He has worked for Thomas De LaRue, establishing and maintaining relationships with senior ministers ofoverseas governments in the negotiation of contracts for the supply of banknotes.Thiswas followed by a spell as head of HR with Lazard Brothers and Co, where he wasresponsible for the controlled integration of HR policies, procedures andoperational functions across its European and Asian offices.Struttjoins Bond Pearce at a time of sustained growth and the firm is recognised asbeing in the top 10 law firms in the UK outside London.Hewill be responsible for providing HR services to Bond Pearce’s team of lawyersand specialist non-legal consultants.Hesaid, “This is an exciting time for the firm and I look forward to workingwith the partners to implement and maintain effective yet flexible HR policiesin tune with the needs of today’s modern working environment. I’m delighted tohave joined an organisation that has a clear and distinctive vision of itsfuture.”PersonalprofileKeithAldis, 41, is director of training and education at the ConstructionConfederation. He is a qualified electrical and electronics engineer, teacherand trainer, and lives in Canterbury.Whatis the most important lesson you have learnt in your career?That people are what businesses are all about. It’s no use a companycarrying out its business without supporting the people delivering it.Whatis the best thing about HR?The fact that I am involved in almost every aspect of the business and ableto influence its direction. Whatis the worst?The hardest is getting people to take responsibility for their actions andgetting them to learn from their mistakes. Conversely, when it all goes right,making sure they are stimulated enough to continue to succeed.Youhave stumbled on a time machine in the vaults of your company building. Whattime period would you visit and why?I sometimes feel the building I work in is a time machine – stuck in about1979! But I’d say about 1993 before my wife and I had children and we didn’thave a care in the world – or so we thought.Ifyou could adopt the management style of a historical character, whose would youadopt and why?Oliver Cromwell, for his ability to get a team (the New Model Army), tomake representations in Parliament so as to legitimise it and to use it to faceup to tyranny. This changed constitutional life in Britain for ever.Howdo you get to work?I used to ride my motorbike, but I broke my leg in a road accident lastyear and since then I’ve been driving or going by train. I’m looking forward togetting a new motorbike.Ifyou were to write a book, which subject would you choose?I’m interested in all sorts of things from astronomy to football and frombikes to boats, but I’d like to write about the principle of multitasking.Everyone has the ability to do more than one thing at a time. If we exploitthis, perhaps we’ll find more time for leisure.Whatis your greatest strength?Being able to turn my hand to almost everything in a good-humoured way andencouraging people to chip in.Whatis the biggest risk you ever took?Taking a job with a car – I was due to start in four weeks but couldn’tdrive. So I took 30 lessons and passed my test on the Friday before I startedwork. Keith Aldis, 41, is director of training and education at theConstruction Confederation. He is a qualified electrical and electronicsengineer, teacher and trainer, and lives in Canterbury. PeopleOn 18 Apr 2001 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more

"People"

Joseph Michael “Mike” Klamert Sr

first_imgJoseph Michael “Mike” Klamert Sr., 82, of Aurora, IN, formerly of Cleveland, Ohio passed away Thursday, January 21, 2016 in Aurora, IN.He was born Tuesday, April 4, 1933 in Cleveland, Ohio, Son of the late Edward Klamert and the late Mary Maruna Klamert.Mike served his Country as a member of the United States Air Force.He worked as a Supervisor for Republic Steel.He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus Council 2111 Aurora (3rd°) and the Catholic War Veterans Post 1812, Garfield Heights, Ohio. He enjoyed woodworking and was involved with activities at Hillforest. Mike participated in Civil War Reenactments and he was a former care taker at Verastau.Surviving are his son, Joseph “Joe” M. Klamert Jr. of Aurora, IN; sister, Annie Leopold of Garfield Heights, Ohio; grandchildren, Shelby Oriane Klamert of Centerville, OH, and Petty Officer 2nd Class, USN Tyler Joseph Klamert of Whidbey Island, WA; significant other, Linda Bonnell.He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Carol Ann (Graf) Klamert and six siblings.Mass of Christian Burial will be held Friday, January 29, 2016 at 11:00 am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 203 Fourth Street, Aurora, Indiana with Father Stephen Donahue officiating.Interment will be at a later date in the Holy Cross Cemetery, Pataskala, Ohio. Military services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to the Knights of Columbus. Please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comJoseph Michael “Mike” Klamert Sr., 82, of Aurora, IN, formerly of Cleveland, Ohio passed away Thursday, January 21, 2016 in Aurora, IN.He was born Tuesday, April 4, 1933 in Cleveland, Ohio, Son of the late Edward Klamert and the late Mary Maruna Klamert.Mike served his Country as a member of the United States Air Force.He worked as a Supervisor for Republic Steel.He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus Council 2111 Aurora (3rd°) and the Catholic War Veterans Post 1812, Garfield Heights, Ohio. He enjoyed woodworking and was involved with activities at Hillforest. Mike participated in Civil War Reenactments and he was a former care taker at Verastau.Surviving are his son, Joseph “Joe” M. Klamert Jr. of Aurora, IN; sister, Annie Leopold of Garfield Heights, Ohio; grandchildren, Shelby Oriane Klamert of Centerville, OH, and Petty Officer 2nd Class, USN Tyler Joseph Klamert of Whidbey Island, WA; significant other, Linda Bonnell.He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Carol Ann (Graf) Klamert and six siblings.Mass of Christian Burial will be held Friday, January 29, 2016 at 11:00 am at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 203 Fourth Street, Aurora, Indiana with Father Stephen Donahue officiating.Interment will be at a later date in the Holy Cross Cemetery, Pataskala, Ohio. Military services will be conducted by members of local Veterans Service Organizations.Contributions in lieu of flowers may be made to the Knights of Columbus. Please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

"Joseph Michael “Mike” Klamert Sr"

Marian Rae takes office as England Golf President

first_img18 Apr 2016 Marian Rae takes office as England Golf President Yorkshire’s Marian Rae took office as the new President of England Golf at the organisation’s annual meeting.Marian, from Lindrick Golf Club, has been a prominent figure in English women’s golf and in Yorkshire civic life.She chaired the championship committee of the former English Women’s Golf Association (EWGA) and continued in the role after the merger which formed England Golf.She has also been the High Sheriff of South Yorkshire, holding the office in the year of the Queen’s Golden Jubilee, and is a Deputy Lieutenant for South Yorkshire. Click here to read more about Marian.Three new women members have been elected to the Board of England Golf. They are: Carol Alford, the Staffordshire Ladies’ County Golf Association Voting Member since 2014; Jill Dean, the Berkshire Ladies’ County Golf Association Voting Member since 2014; and Carole Waights, the Yorkshire Ladies’ County Golf Association Voting Member since 2014.last_img read more

"Marian Rae takes office as England Golf President"

The Port of Olympia BoatSwap & Chowder Challenge Seeks Vendors, Swappers,…

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin1Submitted by The Port of OlympiaJust in time for boating season, the Port of Olympia BoatSwap & Chowder Challenge returns on Saturday, May 17, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Swantown Marina.The Port invites signups from restaurants and marine-related businesses who would like to participate. Businesses and organizations are also invited to participate with the Port in sponsoring this popular community festival.To be included on the event poster, restaurants and sponsors must sign up by March 17.At the 2013 festival, 11 South Sound restaurants competed in the chowder cook-off and 1,300 of the 3,500 attendees tasted the chowders and voted for their favorites.The BoatSwap offers opportunities to buy and sell new and used boats, marine gear and accessories. Both commercial and private vendors are invited to exhibit and sell their wares.Event-goers shop and browse the boats and marine displays, watch and taste at the chowder pots, and enjoy music and family entertainment along the waterfront.To sign up and learn details about event sponsorships, restaurant participation, vendor exhibit rates and to make other inquiries, visit www.portolympia.com, call the Port at 360.528.8005 or email [email protected] several years prior to 2008, the festival was known as the Swantown BoatSwap & Chowder Challenge. The Port retired the event in 2008 and brought it back in 2013 due to community requests.Swantown Marina is located on the East Bay of Budd Inlet at 1022 Marine Drive NE, Olympia, 98501.last_img read more

"The Port of Olympia BoatSwap & Chowder Challenge Seeks Vendors, Swappers,…"

Inverse-Square Law: The Nerdy Term Every Photographer & Filmmaker Should Know

first_imgThis video was first shared by Karl Taylor on his YouTube Channel. Thanks for Sharing Karl! If you want to check out more of Karl’s photography or tutorials you can check out his work at KarlTaylorPhotography.com.Has the Inverse-Square Law helped you in any other ways? Share in the comments below. Learning the Inverse Square Law will help you understand lighting and how it is affected by distance.As a photographer or filmmaker one of the most important lighting terms for you to remember is the Inverse-Square Law, a law stating that the intensity of an effect such as illumination or gravitational force changes, in inverse proportion to the square of the distance from the source. You got that, right?Simply put, the inverse-square law states that there is an exponential relationship between the distance of your light and the amount of light hitting your subject. This means if you move a light from 1 meter away from your subject to 2 meters away, it will only have 25% of the light that was on your subject at 1 meter. If you move your light from 1 meter to 3 meters away it will only have 11% of the light that was on your subject at 1 meter. The same principle applies to any unit of distance. This phenomenon is represented by a surprisingly simple formula:Learning the formula isn’t as important as simply understanding the concept….In practical terms this means if you need more light, simply place your light closer to your subject and you will get exponentially more light. However, there is a trade-off that occurs when you move your light closer to your subject. When lights are far away they are more evenly distributed across multiple subjects or your background, but if you move the light towards your subject there will begin to be an uneven distribution in light. This works great if you are trying to isolate a single subject, but works terribly if you are wanting to shoot a group of people or light an entire scene.The following videos created by photographer Karl Taylor explains the inverse-square law and how understanding it can help you understand lighting more fully as a photographer or filmmaker. The video covers:Inverse-square lawLighting group shotsUnderstanding distance vs light intensityIsolating a subject from the backgroundIf you are still interested in learning more about lighting check out our Lighting for Video series.last_img read more

"Inverse-Square Law: The Nerdy Term Every Photographer & Filmmaker Should Know"

UCF’s Tacko Fall is 7-foot-6, and his game is still growing

first_imgBrace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC FILE – In this Jan. 8, 2017, file photo, Central Florida’s Tacko Fall (24) stands above his team in a huddle during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, in Hartford, Conn. The tallest player in college basketball strolls the campus at UCF _ not your traditional basketball power. But anybody in the NBA or college hoops who doesn’t know 7-foot-6 Tacko Fall should get up to speed on the 21-year-old from Senegal. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)ORLANDO, Fla. — Tacko Fall can never hide.The tallest man in college basketball was walking from the University of Central Florida student union to his dormitory one recent morning, waiting for the light to change at an intersection when a driver — perhaps under the illusion that there’s more than one 7-foot-6 kid enrolled there — hit the brakes and yelled a question out the window.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa They need to keep up with him, too.Fall might be an unusual star, but a star nonetheless. Walk with him around campus, and one of two things often happen — either fellow students yell his name and wave, or they try to act cool while sneaking a selfie. Fall doesn’t mind in either case. And yes, he’s heard every joke imaginable about his height and his name.“He’s very comfortable with who he is,” said Dawkins, who played with 7-7 Manute Bol and 7-6 Shawn Bradley in the NBA and tries to impart wisdom to Fall on what he learned from their experiences.Fall knows what they went through, but doesn’t want to be considered The Next Bol or The Next Bradley.“I want to be the first me,” he said.Fall truly is a center of attention.Wichita State is new to the American Athletic Conference this season, so at the league’s media day last month, Shockers coach Gregg Marshall was learning plenty of new names and faces. Fall, who didn’t exactly need a “Hello My Name Is” sticker on his black UCF polo shirt, went up to Marshall and introduced himself anyway.Marshall was impressed, and hadn’t even seen tape yet.“I saw him in the hallway,” Marshall said. “I’ve never seen a human that big. He’s a great young man.”Fall’s story is almost as unique as his size. Born in Senegal, his family went through some very difficult times. He often didn’t have enough to eat, to the point where he would have nothing for breakfast and then would try to ration his school lunch and preserve some to serve as dinner. Money was often tight. MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games When Fall was 16, Ibrahima N’Diaye changed everything. He ran a basketball academy and suggested to Fallthat he try to play in the U.S.There was one small problem. Fall despised the game, but eventually came around thanks to his basketball-loving grandmother.“There used to be cartoons on every day at 5 o’clock,” Fall said. “And one day, I think our national basketball team was competing, my grandma put that on instead of the cartoons. We had only one TV, and I got mad.”He got over it.He came to the U.S., first going to Houston and then bouncing around a bit before settling in Florida. He enrolled at Liberty Christian Prep — a place where the devout Muslim could have plenty of spirited, respectful, thought-provoking conversations with teachers and other students about religion.It was also a place where he realized basketball could provide a future.“The tough times really make you appreciate what you have,” Fall said. “It’s destiny. I met a guy who I had never met before, went home to talked to my mom about playing basketball which I never imagined I would play, wound up coming to the States and ended up in Florida, the best place I could have ended up at. Everything worked out just fine.”It might only get better.He isn’t sure if he’ll declare for the NBA draft next spring or just again explore his options. He speaks three languages now and is trying to learn Japanese, largely because of his affinity for anime. Food isn’t hard to find now — pasta and chicken before every game is his routine. And he’s hoping that his mom, whom he hasn’t seen in five years, might be able to get to a UCF game this season.And one day, he wants to go home with NBA money to do some good. Ask him his dream plan, and he’ll say itinvolves being able to build schools in Senegal. If everyone at UCF — and in college basketball — doesn’t know who he is yet, they might soon.“He’s learning things now that another player might have learned five years ago, by no fault of his own,” UCF coach Johnny Dawkins said. “He just picked up the game later than everybody else. He’s super-intelligent, speaks multiple languages, he’s just off the charts. He just needs more experience. And how do you gain experience? There’s only one way. You’ve got to get out there and do it.”Fall is a quick study. He’s the reigning defensive player of the year in the American Athletic Conference, a blocker of 164 shots in his first two college seasons and a changer of countless others. He’s made 73 percent of his field-goal attempts in college, since most come around the rim. Defenses last season started pushing him more and more away from the basket, so Fall added a few pounds of muscle this offseason in hopes of pushing back.He took a look at the NBA this past spring, visiting with five clubs to get their feedback on his game.The critiques weren’t often kind. But he listened and learned.“They showed me things,” said Fall, who is listed at 295 pounds. “I was able to see it, not just hear about it, but see it. Skill-wise, I added a lot to my offensive game. Defense is probably going to be the biggest thing for me because of my size and how I can affect the game, but the game has changed a lot. There’s versatile bigs now and I need to keep up.”ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 LATEST STORIES Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Tickets for PH-Japan Fiba World qualifying game in Tokyo sold out “Kids look up to us,” Fall said. “You don’t always get opportunities to get out and do something with your life. Being able to help other people, when you can do that you’ve got to take advantage of it. Life is short. You’ve got to leave your mark. You’ve got to do something that matters. I want to do something that matters.” “Yo,” the man yelled. “You Tacko?”Fall waved, shrugged and smiled as the driver shot him a thumbs-up and drove away.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I think he knew who I was,” Fall said.This is an everyday thing for Elhadji Tacko Sereigne Diop Fall, a 21-year-old from Senegal who grew up playing soccer, couldn’t stand basketball when he first started playing five years ago and now has hopes of an NBA future. He bows his head to get through doorways, prefers sandals to shoes because they’re easier on his size 22 feet, and has found that even first-class airplane seats don’t give him enough leg room. John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. 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"UCF’s Tacko Fall is 7-foot-6, and his game is still growing"